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Oliveo bootcut jeans, Escada booties, silver belt, Hermes collier de chien cuff, ethnic bangle, quartz earrings and Italic citrus boxy cropped Mongolian cashmere sweater

The other day, we were chatting about our new wardrobe updates. Like do you replace beloved pieces or do you go for something totally new? I mean in the sense, you never had a piece like that before. This post shows how beloved pieces from the past can influence what you buy.

Contents
  1. A citrus boxy cashmere sweater lust evoked by a childhood hand-made dress
  2. Impact of the 1980s and 2010s color analyses
  3. The 1990s cropped boxy style
  4. Why is cashmere so soft?
  5. Wrapping up

Disclosure: Sponsored post.

A citrus boxy cashmere sweater lust evoked by a childhood hand-made dress

I recall a citrus boxy sweater dress my Mom once knitted for me. It was my absolute wardrobe favorite in my childhood in 2 to 4th grade. Ever since I am looking for something similar like this boxy cropped cashmere sweater I found accidently at Italic (a retailer that takes the brand out of the equation) for just $75. Not only has it my favorite color, the boxy cut and crewneck like my fav childhood dress, it also has the hand-finished ribbing on the cuffs, waist, and neckline. I loved this finishing back then and still today. It provides an elegant touch! … and comaprable pieces – quality wise – the material is spun from silky soft 100% 7 gauge* Mongolian cashmere – cost $100 at Everlane and $450 at Ralph Lauren.

zoom showing ribbed knit details of sleeves, neck and waist
Zoom-in to show the nice finishing with ribbed knit at the neck, sleeves and waist. I love having sleeves with this finish. It permits pushing the sleeves up. Furthermore, the close fit is perfect to keep cold winter air out of your sleeves.

I was so happy that I found this cute 90s vintage boxy in that amazing citrus color at Italic.com and had to have it.

The citrus color goes well with gray, black, navy, huntergreen, pink and burgundy. It’s a real fashion statement. And cropped boxy is a huge 90s vintage inspired trend right now.

Please feel free to pin the photos to your Pinterest post.
*As usual, terms with a star are explained in the High Latitude Style glossary (opens in a new tab).

fashion blogger in bootcut jeans short pullover

over 50 years old blogger in denim and bold color pulli
Outfit details: Oliveo bootcut jeans, Escada booties, silver belt, Hermes collier de chien cuff, ethnic bangle, quartz earrings and Italic citrus boxy cropped Mongolian cashmere sweater

Impact of the 1980s and 2010s color analyses

When I was a toddler, Mom knitted a dress in the round using double-pointed needles. These needles are also known as wires. The skirt and cheast were sleek A-line in bottlegreen. Above the breast she used cream cashmere yarn and added orange knots for embellishment. I loved the fluffiness of the material, the colors and the sleek style. Ever since I loved bottlegreen and orange pieces.

However, I stopped wearing these colors in the 1980s because I was “diagnosed” as a Winter. Being a winter meant that I would only look great in pink, purple and citrus. In other words, only a fraction of my favorite colors. After I read about the 12 color scheme, I realized what I was missing out all those years! I now understood my love for my orange beret, my crotchet orange with bottlegreen and white 1970s headband – of course with flower like Ali MacGraw. I am actually a so-called Autum/Winter or Deep. Guess, what? That also explained why I looked terrible in the Winter pastels.

… and I added bottlegreen, orange, aubergine, affron, olive, bright red and sunflower yellow back into my wardrobe.

I even thought that one day in a blue Moon* I will remake a dress like that for me.

BW photo of Nicole as toddler in her bottlegreen dress
Black and white photo of me in the bottlegreen dress with cream and orange that my Mom had knitted for me when I was a toddler.

The 1990s cropped boxy style

I recall the boxy top style of the 1990s. I loved it! The cropped hem line draws the attention to the waist. No matter whether the piece is a jacket, sweater or top. It just ends where you are the tinniest. Compared to the width of the boxy piece, your waist looks small even when you are straight-up-and-down like Celine Deon. It’s a perfect style for everyone ruler-shaped like me. The cropped style also gives the illusion of miles-long legs. Perfect to balance the body proportions when you have a long torso.

Did you know that you can determine your body shape right here on High Latitude Style?

The cropped boxy style looks best when paired with a sleek pencil skirt, straight skirt (see outfit inspiration), skinnies or dress trousers.

 

influencer in boxy top, straight tweed skirt, suede boots

stylist in gray bottom and lemon top winter look
Outfit details: Italic citrus boxy cropped Mongolian cashmere sweater, Eddie Bauer gray tweet skirt, GNW tights, Vince Camuto suede boots, Hermes collier de chien bangle, smoky quartz pendant on a leather band. These photos taken in daylight best represent the color. Unfortunatel, at this time of the year that’s the most of light we get.

Why is cashmere so soft?

When you are a regular reader, you know that I have a knack for cashmere. It feels not itchy like sheep’s wool on my skin. In other words, I am not sensitive to the natural fibers of the goats. What makes the difference are the little scales of the fiber. Goat hair has fewer and tinnier scales than sheep hair. Therefore, the surface of a cashmere sweater feels smoother and softer that a pure wool sweater.

Did you know that it takes one Mongolian goat about four years to naturally shed enough underwool to make one cashmere sweater? #funfacts #fashion Click To Tweet

Wrapping up

Trust your guts regarding your favorites. Think why you love a certain color, style. How does it benefit your look? Don’t fall for a brand! You would just pay for the name. Look for high quality pieces instead.

Tip: Retailers who cut out the middlemen, i.e. buy direct from the sources, can offer luxury products at much lower prices than other retailers. See the post at the link to learn more about this concept.

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Photos of me: G. Kramm

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